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Cedar - Riverside/West Bank

West Bank mural
West Bank mural
A hundred years ago, the many theaters in Cedar-Riverside rang with the violin-and-accordion notes of Scandinavian vaudeville. In the late 60s the neighborhood became the city's major hippie haven, anchored by feisty independent bookstores, a pioneering food co-op, and legendary blues and rock clubs. Today a vibrant immigrant community dominated by East Africans rubs shoulders with youthful native-born fun-seekers patronizing the rich mix of bars, restaurants and performance venues that keep the Bank's entertainment heritage alive.

Cedar - Riverside/West Bank Features

Q+A: Shawn Combs Walding, MnDOT's Transit Advantages Coordinator

We recently sat down with Shawn Combs Walding, MnDOT’s Transit Advantages Coordinator for the Twin Cities Metro District to discuss alternative transportation in the Twin Cities, what local entities can do to promote transit use, and how easy it really is to be car-free. 

Equity, Empowerment: How Community-Driven TOD is Transforming Green Line Neighborhoods

Four neighborhood initiatives along the Green Line demonstrate how the Central Corridor is becoming a local and national model for equitable and empowering community-driven transit-oriented development (TOD).    

How Being "Car Ownership Free" Led to Healthy Living, Community Organizing and Embracing Transit

Two years ago, Lars Christiansen and Nancy Fischer sold their car and plunged into the Twin Cities’ rich network of public and alternative modes of transportation, which led to a healthier lifestyle and innovating the Friendly Streets Initiative.  

Beyond the Rails: Mapping the Development, Cultural and Community Impact of the New Green Line

More than providing a convenient, environmentally friendly transit option, the $957 million Green Line light-rail project down the Central Corridor is proving a catalyst for rejuvenating the once vibrant, 11-mile spine connecting the Twin Cities.

Alley Activation: Pathways to Urban Revitalization

From Seattle to Washington D.C., alleys are being reinvented as people-friendly spaces. Often perceived as dirty and dangerous, alleys are moving beyond garbage and garages to become havens for pedestrians, public art and small business.
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